Oliver’s insights – Medium Term Returns

Since 1999 nominal returns have been more constrained averaging 6.2% pa as we entered a lower return world with real returns averaging 3.6% pa. The odds are that returns are likely to be even more constrained over the next 5 to 10 years. This article looks at why.

What does ‘wealthy’ mean to you?

Demographer Bernard Salt shares his insights. To find out more visit: www.amp.com.au/whateverwealthyyouwant Original Author: Produced by AMP and published on 30/08/2023 Source

Oliver’s insights – optimism as an investor

It seems that the worry list for investors has become more threatening and confusing. However, to succeed, it makes sense to err on the side of cautious optimism: otherwise, there is no point in investing; growth assets like shares have trended up over the long term; and trying to get the timing right of the 2 or 3 years out of 10 when they fall can be very hard.

What does Bernard Salt’s research say about housing affordability?

Demographer Bernard Salt shares his insights. To find out more visit www.amp.com.au/whateverwealthyyouwant Original Author: Produced by AMP and published on 30/08/2023 Source

Has increased life expectancy changes the way we think about wealth?

Demographer Bernard Salt shares his findings. To learn more visit: www.amp.com.au/whateverwealthyyouwant Original Author: Produced by AMP and published on 18/08/2023 Source

How are Australians views around home ownership changing?

Demographer Bernard Salt shares his insights. To find out more visit: www.amp.com.au/whateverwealthyyouwant Original Author: Produced by AMP and published on 18/08/2023 Source

Econosights – how much more excess savings do consumers have

This edition of Econosights looks at how much longer households can draw down on savings and what the outlook is for consumer spending.

Oliver’s insights – goldilocks versus recession

Recession versus “goldilocks” – five reasons why we could still avoid
recession

Econosights – financial literacy gender gap

More than one third of adults in Australia are financially illiterate, with opportunities for improvement. There is also a gender gap in financial literacy in Australia. Women tend to have lower financial literacy than men. In Australia, the gender gap is larger compared to our global peers.

Econosights: Three reasons why Australia is more vulnerable to higher rates | AMP Capital

Econosights: Three reasons why Australia is more vulnerable to higher rates Key points Australian consumers are more vulnerable to interest rate rises compared to our global peers because of : 1) higher levels of household debt; 2) a higher share of variable rate mortgages and even those on fixed-loans only fix for a relatively short period of time; and 3) a large share of recently fixed mortgages are due to expire in the second half …